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How to Grow Sweet Peas From Seed

complimentary sweet pea seeds in a presentation box 

We include a complimentary box of sweet pea seeds with every order in the hope that you will plant and grow the sweet peas to provide a rich source of nectar as a ‘Thank you’ to the bees. We chose sweet peas not only because they produce beautiful flowers but because they are in the Top 10 of plant species for nectar production in terms of µg of sugar/flower/day [1].

They are also some of the most versatile plants you can grow. Train them up a trellis, pergola or obelisk, or support them with canes in large pots. They bring height and colour to borders and their scented blooms can be used as cut flowers.
how to grow sweet peas from seed

GROWING TIPS

  • Most trials have proved that soaking seed overnight is not necessary and you get better germination without.

  • You do not need to nick the seed coat either.

  • Most expert growers of sweet peas recommend sowing seeds individually in seed compost using loo rolls that give a nice deep, narrow root run, just what sweet peas need. This will also enable you to plant them out in their containers without damaging the roots.

  • Don’t water after sowing, only start when the shoots start to come through, usually in 10-14 days.

  • Don’t mollycoddle them – that’s the most common mistake. No heat is required. Once sown, put them in a cold spot – the seed is frost tolerant to about -10C and a bit of frost seems to do them good. As they grow, you’ll notice roots start to emerge through the sides of the cardboard tubes.

  • Pinch out the growing point when seedlings have two-three pairs of leaves, to encourage bushy growth.

  • Once you have bushy little seedlings 2-3in tall, with roots coming out of the loo roll, plant outside.

  • Pick, pick, pick. Once seed pods form the plant thinks its life’s work is done and will stop flowering, so the more you pick, they more they’ll flower.

sweet pea flowers

[1] https://www.conservationgrade.org/2014/10/which_flowers_best_source_nectar/